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TOPIC: Good and bad fats: Do these foods pass?

Good and bad fats: Do these foods pass? 26 Apr 2006 02:25 #3323

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Debra, I'm just going to keep a running list of foods I love and have questions about:

Are avocados ok? I read they are high in oleic acid. Does that mean they are not high in saturated fats?

Good and bad fats: Do these foods pass? 26 Apr 2006 02:41 #3324

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Here's another we've talked about a lot but now I'm confused. I just read about Cashews on World's Healthiest Foods (where I've spent the past hour reading about all sorts of delicious things) and it seems to contradict what we've been saying.

Is monounsaturated fat the same as saturated fat? Does Oleic acid make up for the saturated fats?

This is what they have to say about Cashews:

[i:7c3019f360]Health Benefits
Heart-Protective Monounsaturated Fats

Not only do cashews have a lower fat content than most other nuts, approximately 75% of their fat is unsaturated fatty acids, plus about 75% of this unsaturated fatty acid content is oleic acid, the same heart-healthy monounsaturated fat found in olive oil. ... Just a quarter-cup of these delicious nuts supplies 37.4% of the daily value for monounsaturated fat.

In addition to their healthful monounsaturated fats, cashews are a good source of copper, magnesium, zinc and biotin[/i:7c3019f360]

I thought I'd also post this tidbit about Cashews and the absorption of Calcium from the same source. Is this a concern?

[i:7c3019f360]Cashews and Oxalates

Cashews are among a small number of foods that contain any measurable amount of oxalates, naturally-occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. ... Oxalates may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body. For this reason, individuals trying to increase their calcium stores may want to avoid cashews, or if taking calcium supplements, may want to eat cashews 2-3 hours before or after taking their supplements. [/i:7c3019f360]

Alex

Good and bad fats: Do these foods pass? 26 Apr 2006 13:33 #3325

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[quote:8bdc2bbbd2="januaryriver"]Debra, I'm just going to keep a running list of foods I love and have questions about:

Are avocados ok? I read they are high in oleic acid. Does that mean they are not high in saturated fats?[/quote:8bdc2bbbd2]

Ok, Great--keep them coming. :D

Are you ready for a little food chemistry class?

Here's where you need to remember-- oleic acid is [b:8bdc2bbbd2]NOT[/b:8bdc2bbbd2] an Omega 3 fatty acid. Oleic acids are an omega 9 fatty acid that can lead down the pathway to cause inflammation and are not essential meaning your body can easily make it if necessary.

It's still classified unsaturated but is widely available in foods-- plant and animal. On the whole, avocados are a wonderful food and are fairly low in saturated fat, approx. 4.5g if you ate a whole med size avocado and 306 kcals. Keep in mind that it's still very high in total fat 30grams, so if you are on a 1,600 to 1,800 calorie a day diet, you want to keep your total fat intake to no more than 400 to 540 calories or 45 to 60grams.

Omega 3's are alpha-linolenic acid, (ALA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), these are essential because the body can't make them. It's the omega 3's that are [b:8bdc2bbbd2]very low[/b:8bdc2bbbd2] in the average US diet and are [b:8bdc2bbbd2]very necessary[/b:8bdc2bbbd2] for optimal health.

Omega 6's are also essential, meaning the body can't make them [b:8bdc2bbbd2]BUT[/b:8bdc2bbbd2] they're highly available in our foods and can also lead to the inflammation pathway if eaten in large amounts. It's called Linoleic acid (remember it's very different than linole[u:8bdc2bbbd2]ni[/u:8bdc2bbbd2]c acid.) Omega 6's are available in corn, corn oil, safflower, cottonseed, sunflower seed, and peanuts and peanut oils, vegetable oils.

Don't get too caught up in thinking all poly or monounsaturated fatty acids are OK in any quantity, but they are better than saturated or partially hydrogenated oils of any kind.

I hope this makes sense. Lipids, fatty acids, good and bad fats can be very confusing. We need to have a good balance of omega 6 to omega 3 and saturated and unsaturated fats in our diet.

I like to focus on the omega 3's and let the omega 6 and 9's take care of themselves. As long as you're eating lots of cold water fish or taking a good omega 3 capsule of either flaxseed or fish oil or both, you can get enough of these fatty acids to balance out the rest of the fatty acids.

Good and bad fats: Do these foods pass? 26 Apr 2006 14:22 #3326

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[quote:51c52d8d2a="januaryriver"]Here's another we've talked about a lot but now I'm confused. I just read about Cashews on World's Healthiest Foods (where I've spent the past hour reading about all sorts of delicious things) and it seems to contradict what we've been saying.

Is monounsaturated fat the same as saturated fat?
[color=blue:51c52d8d2a]No, they are very different think chemical structure, saturated means every carbon is loaded with hydrogen (no double bonds), a mono unsaturated contains one double bond. [/color:51c52d8d2a]
Does Oleic acid make up for the saturated fats?
[color=blue:51c52d8d2a]NO, not sure exactly what you're getting at but you can't make up for any saturated fat with another fat no matter how good.[/color:51c52d8d2a]
This is what they have to say about Cashews:

[i:51c52d8d2a]Health Benefits
Heart-Protective Monounsaturated Fats

Not only do cashews have a lower fat content than most other nuts,
[color=blue:51c52d8d2a]This is not really true, Almonds are lower and have a better profile but you have to consider how it's cooked, roasted or oil roasted and HOW MUCH YOU EAT. Read the label on the bag or can.[/color:51c52d8d2a]
approximately 75% of their fat is unsaturated fatty acids, plus about 75% of this unsaturated fatty acid content is oleic acid, the same heart-healthy monounsaturated fat found in olive oil
[color=blue:51c52d8d2a]Again, it depends on how much you eat, and on how the cashews are cooked, on the average a person may not stop at 5 or 6 cashews. 1/3 cup of cashews (dry roasted) contains 21g of total fat 4.1g sat fat, 3.5g poly and 15g of mono unsat. now if your like most people 1/3rd cup may turn into 1/2 cup so again you're still adding total fat and omega 9s.

Most yummy cashews however are oil roasted which then makes 1/3 cup 63g of total fat, 12.4g sat, 10.6 poly unsat, and 36g mono. [/color:51c52d8d2a]
. ... Just a quarter-cup of these delicious nuts supplies 37.4% of the daily value for monounsaturated fat.

In addition to their healthful monounsaturated fats, cashews are a good source of copper, magnesium, zinc and biotin[/i:51c52d8d2a]

I thought I'd also post this tidbit about Cashews and the absorption of Calcium from the same source. Is this a concern?

[i:51c52d8d2a]Cashews and Oxalates

Cashews are among a small number of foods that contain any measurable amount of oxalates, naturally-occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. ... Oxalates may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body. For this reason, individuals trying to increase their calcium stores may want to avoid cashews, or if taking calcium supplements, may want to eat cashews 2-3 hours before or after taking their supplements. [/i:51c52d8d2a]

[b:51c52d8d2a][color=blue:51c52d8d2a]I don't recommend eating cashews so this is shouldn't be a problem with women on the Cycle Diet.[/color:51c52d8d2a][/b:51c52d8d2a]
Alex[/quote:51c52d8d2a]


Try to eat almonds and walnuts in small amounts instead of cashews. BUT if you have to eat a few cashews move them into the follicular phase.
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