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TOPIC: How much Omega 3 in Fish

How much Omega 3 in Fish 13 Mar 2007 20:39 #3574

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I got this great question today from Cindy via e-mail, after she mentioned to me that she wasn't tolerating the fish oil capsule she purchased at Walgreen's. I suggested she eat fatty fish at least 3 times a week.

Cindy wrote:

I wouldn't mind eating fish 3 times a week.  My question is, how much should the fish weigh when I buy it in order to get 1000 mgs? (1,000mg= 1gram)  I have a meat market I like to go to to buy meats.  I know I could eat it like Monday Wednesday and Fridays for lunch.  That'll work out good for me. 
 
Cindy

Hi Cindy,

I found a wonderful source of simple information regarding amounts of Omega 3 in different kinds of fish on the Cleveland Clinic's website (inside their Heart & Vascular section) description of Omega 3's and the power of fish

Here's the link to more great information about Omega 3's, why they're important and about heart health, something I know you're interested in too. http://www.clevelandclinic.org/heartcenter/pub/guide/prevention/nutrition/omega3.htm

One cautionary note: If you are looking to become pregnant again, I suggest you stick with farmed Alaskan or Pacific Salmon or wild Salmon if you can find a good source due to the absence or very low levels of mercury. Albacore tuna is another to avoid, but not on this list anyway. Talk with your butcher or meat market, they should have a good idea about this and if you should eat Atlantic Salmon, once a week should be okay.



[align=center][font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Amount of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Selected Fish and Seafood [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Fish [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Serving Size [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Amount of Omega-3 Fat [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Atlantic Salmon or Herring [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]1.9 grams [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Blue Fin Tuna [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]1.5 grams [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Sardines, canned [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 oz. in tomato sauce [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]1.5 grams [/font]


[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Anchovies, canned [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]2 ounces drained [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]1.2 grams [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Atlantic Mackerel [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]1.15 grams [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Salmon, canned [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces drained [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]1.0 gram [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Swordfish [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]0.9. gram [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Sea Bass (mixed species) [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]0.65 gram [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Tuna, white meat canned [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces drained [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]0.5 gram [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Sole, Flounder, Mussels [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]0.4 gram [/font]

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Wild Catfish, crabmeat, clams [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked/steamed [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]0.3 gram [/font]

Prawns (jumbo shrimp)
6 pieces
0.15 gram

Atlantic Cod, Lobster
3 ounces cooked/steamed
0.15 gram

[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]Trout, Orange roughy [/font]
[font="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"]3 ounces cooked [/font]

[/size][/font] <.10 gram
[/align]

How much Omega 3 in Fish 11 Oct 2008 16:35 #3575

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Why Omega 3's are essential:

Omega-3 DHA and EPA for cognition, behavior, and mood: clinical findings and structural-function al synergies with cell membrane phospholipids.
Kidd PM.
University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.

The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are orthomolecular, conditionally essential nutrients that enhance quality of life and lower the risk of premature death. They function exclusively via cell membranes, in which they are anchored by phospholipid molecules. DHA is proven essential to pre- and postnatal brain development, whereas EPA seems more influential on behavior and mood. Both DHA and EPA generate neuroprotective metabolites. In double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, DHA and EPA combinations have been shown to benefit attention deficit/hyperactivi ty disorder (AD/HD), autism, dyspraxia, dyslexia, and aggression. For the affective disorders, meta-analyses confirm benefits in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder, with promising results in schizophrenia and initial benefit for borderline personality disorder. Accelerated cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) correlate with lowered tissue levels of DHA/EPA, and supplementation has improved cognitive function. Huntington disease has responded to EPA. Omega-3 phospholipid supplements that combine DHA/EPA and phospholipids into the same molecule have shown marked promise in early clinical trials. Phosphatidylserine with DHA/EPA attached (Omega-3 PS) has been shown to alleviate AD/HD symptoms. Krill omega-3 phospholipids, containing mostly phosphatidylcholine (PC) with DHA/EPA attached, markedly outperformed conventional fish oil DHA/EPA triglycerides in double-blind trials for premenstrual syndrome/dysmenorrh ea and for normalizing blood lipid profiles. Krill omega-3 phospholipids demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity, lowering C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in a double-blind trial. Utilizing DHA and EPA together with phospholipids and membrane antioxidants to achieve a triple cell membrane synergy may further diversify their currently wide range of clinical applications.



Omega-3 fatty acids in ADHD and related neurodevelopmental disorders.
Richardson AJ.

Department of Physiology, Human Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, UK. alex.richardson@ physiol.ox. ac.uk

Omega-3 fatty acids are dietary essentials, and are critical to brain development and function. Increasing evidence suggests that a relative lack of omega-3 may contribute to many psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. This review focuses on the possible role of omega-3 in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and related childhood developmental disorders, evaluating the existing evidence from both research and clinical perspectives. Theory and experimental evidence support a role for omega-3 in ADHD, dyslexia, developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and autism. Results from controlled treatment trials are mixed, but the few studies in this area have involved different populations and treatment formulations. Dietary supplementation with fish oils (providing EPA and DHA) appears to alleviate ADHD-related symptoms in at least some children, and one study of DCD children also found benefits for academic achievement. Larger trials are now needed to confirm these findings, and to establish the specificity and durability of any treatment effects as well as optimal formulations and dosages. Omega-3 is not supported by current evidence as a primary treatment for ADHD or related conditions, but further research in this area is clearly warranted. Given their relative safety and general health benefits, omega-3 fatty acids offer a promising complementary approach to standard treatments.

How much Omega 3 in Fish 11 Oct 2008 23:41 #3576

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when I take my fish oil (salmon) it causes me to burp a lot...I assume that means I dont tolerate it very well? I dont do that when I eat salmon though?

How much Omega 3 in Fish 12 Oct 2008 12:21 #3577

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Yes Sol,

You could be short on bile (created in the liver, stored in the gallbladder) or short on lipase, the enzyme that helps break down fat. Just take one at a time.

How much Omega 3 in Fish 13 Oct 2008 19:02 #3578

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Thank you for putting this information here about Omega 3's, I too am having lots of burping up of icky fish oil (yuk). I now understand which fish I should eat more of now. Great information, keep it coming!

I love this website. :)
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