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TOPIC: Corn Syrup Commercial

Corn Syrup Commercial 11 Sep 2008 00:54 #3823

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Not sure if this is the place to post or not.  When I saw this commercial, I instantly thought of the Cycle Diet Board :).  It goes something like this:

Girl is eating popsicle.  Boy:  "you shouldn't be eating that, it has high fructose corn syrup"  Girl: "Why is that bad for me?".  Boy:  (silence) "I don't know".  Girl: something about 'all things in moderation'.  Naturally, sponsored by some corn council. 

Anyway, I found it interesting.  And also found myself thinking - could I actually say why corn syrups are bad?  hmmm....

Corn Syrup Commercial 11 Sep 2008 01:06 #3824

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Okay, are you talking about the lastest propaganda advertisement by the corn council? I found it on youtube in case anyone was intersted.

[flash=510,426] www.youtube.com/v/KVsgXPt564Q&hl=en&fs [/flash]

Corn Syrup Commercial 11 Sep 2008 01:17 #3825

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In case you're wondering why I suggest to avoid it and other refined sugars is that it's very hard on the liver. High fructose sugar is not the same as sugar cane or honey, it's not natural and the body isn't able to process it in the same way as sucrose. The body has a harder time recognizing the calories, which may actually increase appetite.

Here's a more scientific explanation from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition :
This is just an exerpt from the research article. If you want to read the full article it's available inside the link.

Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity1 2 [/suP]
George A Bray, Samara Joy Nielsen and Barry M Popkin

[size=-1]1 From the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (GAB), and the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (SJN and BMP). [/size]

Absorption of fructose
The digestive and absorptive processes for glucose and fructose are different. When disaccharides such as sucrose or maltose enter the intestine, they are cleaved by disaccharidases. A sodium-glucose cotransporter absorbs the glucose that is formed from cleavage of sucrose. Fructose, in contrast, is absorbed further down in the duodenum and jejunum by a non-sodium-dependent process. After absorption, glucose and fructose enter the portal circulation and either are transported to the liver, where the fructose can be taken up and converted to glucose, or pass into the general circulation. The addition of small, catalytic amounts of fructose to orally ingested glucose increases hepatic glycogen synthesis in human subjects and reduces glycemic responses in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus ( 12 ), which suggests the importance of fructose in modulating metabolism in the liver. However, when large amounts of fructose are ingested, they provide a relatively unregulated source of carbon precursors for hepatic lipogenesis.

Fructose and insulin release
Along with 2 peptides, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 released from the gastrointestinal tract, circulating glucose increases insulin release from the pancreas ( 13 , 14 ). Fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion in vitro, probably because the ß cells of the pancreas lack the fructose transporter Glut-5 ( 15 , 16 ). Thus, when fructose is given in vivo as part of a mixed meal, the increase in glucose and insulin is much smaller than when a similar amount of glucose is given. However, fructose produces a much larger increase in lactate and a small (1.7%) increase in diet-induced thermogenesis ( 17 ), which again suggests that glucose and fructose have different metabolic effects.
Insulin and leptin
Insulin release can modulate food intake by at least 2 mechanisms. First, Schwartz et al ( 18 ) have argued that insulin concentrations in the central nervous system have a direct inhibitory effect on food intake. In addition, insulin may modify food intake by its effect on leptin secretion, which is mainly regulated by insulin-induced changes in glucose metabolism in fat cells ( 19 , 20 ). Insulin increases leptin release ( 21 ) with a time delay of several hours. Thus, a low insulin concentration after ingestion of fructose would be associated with lower average leptin concentrations than would be seen after ingestion of glucose. Because leptin inhibits food intake, the lower leptin concentrations induced by fructose would tend to enhance food intake. This is most dramatically illustrated in humans who lack leptin ( 22 , 23 ). Persons lacking leptin (homozygotes) are massively obese ( 22 ), and heterozygotes with low but detectable serum leptin concentrations have increased adiposity ( 23 ), which indicates that low leptin concentrations are associated with increased hunger and gains in body fat. Administration of leptin to persons who lack it produces a dramatic decrease in food intake, as expected. Leptin also increases energy expenditure, and during reduced calorie intake, leptin attenuates the decreases in thyroid hormones and 24-h energy expenditure ( 24 ). To the extent that fructose increases in the diet, one might expect less insulin secretion and thus less leptin release and a reduction in the inhibitory effect of leptin on food intake, ie, an increase in food intake. This was found in the preliminary studies reported by Teff et al ( 25 ). Consumption of high-fructose meals reduced 24-h plasma insulin and leptin concentrations and increased postprandial fasting triacylglycerol concentrations in women but did not suppress circulating ghrelin concentrations.
Fructose and metabolism
The metabolism of fructose differs from that of glucose in several other ways as well ( 3 ). Glucose enters cells by a transport mechanism (Glut-4) that is insulin dependent in most tissues. Insulin activates the insulin receptor, which in turn increases the density of glucose transporters on the cell surface and thus facilitates the entry of glucose. Once inside the cell, glucose is phosphorylated by glucokinase to become glucose-6-phosphate, from which the intracellular metabolism of glucose begins. Intracellular enzymes can tightly control conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to the glycerol backbone of triacylglycerols through modulation by phosphofructokinase. In contrast with glucose, fructose enters cells via a Glut-5 transporter that does not depend on insulin. This transporter is absent from pancreatic ß cells and the brain, which indicates limited entry of fructose into these tissues. Glucose provides "satiety" signals to the brain that fructose cannot provide because it is not transported into the brain. Once inside the cell, fructose is phosphorylated to form fructose-1-phosphate ( 26 ). In this configuration, fructose is readily cleaved by aldolase to form trioses that are the backbone for phospholipid and triacyglycerol synthesis. Fructose also provides carbon atoms for synthesis of long-chain fatty acids, although in humans, the quantity of these carbon atoms is small. Thus, fructose facilitates the biochemical formation of triacylglycerols more efficiently than does glucose ( 3 ). For example, when a diet containing 17% fructose was provided to healthy men and women, the men, but not the women, showed a highly significant increase of 32% in plasma triacylglycerol concentrations ( 27 ).
Overconsumption of sweetened beverages
One model for producing obesity in rodents is to provide sweetened (sucrose, maltose, etc) beverages for them to drink ( 28 ). In this setting, the desire for the calorically sweetened solution reduces the intake of solid food, but not by enough to prevent a positive caloric balance and the slow development of obesity. Adding the same amount of sucrose or maltose as of a solid in the diet does not produce the same response. Thus, in experimental animals, sweetened beverages appear to enhance caloric consumption.

Corn Syrup Commercial 11 Sep 2008 01:44 #3826

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Here's a recent article from the Los Angeles Times regarding the consumer trend away from HFCS

Consumers are raising cane over HFCS

It's apparent the Corn refiners council is very worried about this trend and hope to slow it down or stop it.

Hey who can you trust but your dietitian from the great state of Iowa, the state that grows the most corn in the world. :D

Corn Syrup Commercial 11 Sep 2008 13:36 #3827

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After I posted, I found a post on here that discussed the reasons why we shouldn't eat corn syrup.....now I can respond to the commercial :)

Corn Syrup Commercial 11 Sep 2008 16:44 #3828

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Corn Syrup Commercial 30 Sep 2008 22:35 #3829

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More great info, thanks! I'm never disappointed when I visit this support board.

Corn Syrup Commercial 07 Nov 2008 11:33 #3830

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Speaking of sweetners, is honey an ok food on the cycle diet?  I hope you say yes b/c I've been using it in cooking instead of sugar.  It tastes great in sweet potatoes or salmon and no one knew I didn't use sugar in my sweet potatoe dish.

Corn Syrup Commercial 07 Nov 2008 13:43 #3831

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Honey is fine as long as it's not mixed with HFCS.....read the label. Honey is getting very expensive so some are adding sugar to it to keep the price down.
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