Forgot Password       
×

Notice

The forum is in read only mode.
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
If you have a question about The Cycle Diet, post them here. Registered users only.
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Egg Allergy

Egg Allergy 06 Dec 2008 13:37 #3867

  • Debra
  • Debra's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • CycleDiet Registered Dietitian
  • Posts: 2416
  • Karma: 3
  • Thank you received: 129
Eggs are included in the top 8 allergens and are more common among young children who seem to outgrow the IgE reaction as they age. Some people may also develop a non-IgE immune response to eggs which may show up in eczema.

If you suspect a delayed egg allergy, try eliminating them for a week and then add them back during one meal and wait.

Here's a research abstract you may like to read:

Educational Series
Egg allergy
Andrew S. Kemp 1,2
Andrewk5@chw.edu.au

Copyright 2007 The Author Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard

KEYWORDS
anaphylaxis • egg hypersensitivity • egg white • egg yolk • urticaria • vaccination


Kemp AS. Egg allergy.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2007: 18: 696–702.
© 2007 The Author
Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard

ABSTRACT
Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies in infants and young children. The great majority is not life-threatening and management involves exclusion of egg from the diet and regular review with the expectation that the majority of children will outgrow the allergy by school age. Judgment is required as to when the dietary elimination of egg is no longer required. This decision may be helped by demonstrating loss of sensitivity by skin prick or specific IgE testing and in some cases a supervised food challenge. Particular issues in management arise with more severe, potentially life-threatening reactions, with immunization with vaccines prepared in eggs, with the diagnosis of egg hypersensitivity as a cause of delayed exacerbations of eczema which can be non-IgE mediated, and in deciding whether a child can be allowed to ingest small amounts of cooked egg through egg-containing foods while continuing to avoid raw egg or larger amounts of whole egg. Cases which illustrate these issues are presented.

Egg Allergy 06 Dec 2008 13:42 #3868

  • Debra
  • Debra's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • CycleDiet Registered Dietitian
  • Posts: 2416
  • Karma: 3
  • Thank you received: 129
Egg allergies and substitutes:

http://www.foodallergy.org/allergens/egg.html

Tips for Managing an Egg Allergy
Baking
For each egg, substitute one of the following in recipes. These substitutes work well when baking from scratch and substituting 1 to 3 eggs.

  • 1 tsp. baking powder, 1 T. liquid, 1 T. vinegar
  • 1 tsp. yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 1/2 T. water, 1 1/2 T. oil, 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 packet gelatin, 2 T. warm water. Do not mix until ready to use.
Some Hidden Sources of Egg [/*]
  • Eggs have been used to create the foam or milk topping on specialty coffee drinks and are used in some bar drinks.
  • Some commercial brands of egg substitutes contain egg whites.
  • Most commercially processed cooked pastas (including those used in prepared foods such as soup) contain egg or are processed on equipment shared with egg-containing pastas. Boxed, dry pastas are usually egg-free, but may be processed on equipment that is also used for egg-containing products. Fresh pasta is sometimes egg-free, too. Read the label or ask about ingredients before eating pasta.

see more about egg allergies at the link above.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.063 seconds