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TOPIC: How Many Cycles does it take??

How Many Cycles does it take?? 30 Jun 2010 17:31 #4009

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I've been faithfully keeping to the diet for going on three weeks now. My pmdd symptoms are due to hit late this week or next week. I have definitely been much more moody and irritable the past couple of days, and I'm frustrated and worried that I'm going to experience the same pmdd junk that I always do, just based on how I'm feeling now.
Am I being too impatient?
How many cycles should I wait until I start considering gluten sensitivities and possible malabsorption?

Thanks for your help! :?

Elizabeth

How Many Cycles does it take?? 30 Jun 2010 21:17 #4010

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It takes a couple cycles (even gluten-free) to feel significantly different. But if you are starting to feel bad already, you should really consider taking the gluten out now as a trial. You may feel a bit of a withdrawal, but then you'll start to see steady improvements, but also be aware that you "could" have other food sensitivities. Top 8 are Dairy, eggs, wheat/gluten, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shell fish. Some also have sensitivity to food additives, preservatives, food colors and sugar/fructose. It's important to pay attention to what you eat and your moods. Some delayed food allergies can take 12-24 hours to show up. Most however are noticeable within 2 hours.

Women who are gluten and dairy sensitive notice some real improvements after only one full cycle.

Consider taking both gluten and dairy out of your diet for the next couple weeks and see if it makes a difference, you may be surprised.

How Many Cycles does it take?? 30 Jun 2010 21:28 #4011

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So I don't necessarily need to do the testing? Basically if take it out, and see improvements then I can just assume that I have gluten sensitivities and stay away from it?
But then it could be something else as well, like dairy, too. I haven't had any dairy this entire week, sticking only to soy since I'm in the luteal phase. So, could I assume that dairy is ok for me and just try for the gluten-free?

I'm so impatient to get this taken care of, the process of going through anymore cycles trying out different things just feels frustrating to me.

I'm trying to be more patient, so forgive me for my frustrations. :?

Thanks!

How Many Cycles does it take?? 30 Jun 2010 22:13 #4012

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Ideally you should do testing. If you have Celiac disease on either side of the family, I would first do the Celiac panel to at least rule out Celiac disease. But most women don't actually have full blown Celiac. It runs in the family so be sure and ask on both sides if anyone...aunts, uncles, grandpa, grandma have it.

 I've found food sensitivity testing is expensive if your insurance company won't cover it. I like http://www.enterolab.com for gluten, dairy, egg, soy, yeast and malabsorption. They test only for gluten sensitivity, NOT Celiac disease. They also do genetic testing for the Celiac genes, but the HLA DQ2 is pretty common and doesn't rule out a gluten sensitivity or non-Celiac gluten sensitivity.

If you pull gluten out of your diet along with the dairy for the next two weeks you may be able to see some improvements and you can always tell when you add it back again (feeling depressed, fatigued, ill, foggy brain). I've found unless you have a noticeable response you won't keep 100% gluten-free. If you are gluten sensitive, you need to be 100% gluten free at ALL TIMES. A positive result confirms  this so you never question "what if it's something else".

Enterolab can pick up IgA antibodies after you've been gluten-free for over a month, maybe even 2 months. However, you need to be consuming gluten in order for the blood tests to work accurately.  (please read sheet inside cover of workbook) So IF you want to be screened for Celiac you should NOT remove gluten for more than 2 weeks. Antibodies then start to fall rather quickly.

I would keep dairy free if you are lactose intolerant. You can always do a dairy challenge later if you don't want to spend the money for testing.

Food sensitivites are more pronounced in the luteal phase so pay close attention to everything.

How Many Cycles does it take?? 01 Jul 2010 04:14 #4013

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Thanks! Checked out enterolab, and it looks good. My husband and I both feel like it's worth the money just to know for sure if there are any sensitivities so that we can either rule it out or move forward with the right diet.
I'm sure you hear this a lot, but at this point I am willing to do whatever it takes to get this under control!
As far as the testing that this doctor does, are you familiar with it and feel that it is legitimate and well done? Just curious since it's pretty expensive. Want to make sure!

Thanks for the help, again.:)

How Many Cycles does it take?? 01 Jul 2010 12:44 #4014

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I do like Enterolabs, they use the SAME assay to test for the gliadin IgA antibodies in the stool that they use for blood. IgA antibodies develop inside the mucosa. Detection is easier at the source...prior to making it into the blood stream from a leaky gut.

I've referred women who test negative on the Celiac panel to Enterolab who then tested positive, removed gluten and/or dairy  from their diet and felt better.

IMO: Dr. Fine is not what I would consider a mainstream gastroenterologist such as many of the University connected Celiac researchers. Even though Dr. Fine is a board certified gastro, I've seen other mainstream Celiac-gastros tip toeing around his stool test, possibly because he holds a patent on his lab assay procedure. What I normally say is...the proof is in the diet. These patents do expire...it could be a matter of waiting and/or developing new more sensitive tests.

A couple of the well known Celiac researchers like Dr Fasano at the Celiac Center at the University of Maryland and Dr. Stefano Guandalini at the Celiac Center at the University of Chicago are working at better testing for non-celiac gluten sensitivity BUT, it could take years for the test to go mainstream after years of clinical trials.

Dr Fine's test like other ELISA tests are not perfect and then there's the the false negatives with people who are IgA deficient. 1-400 people are IgA deficient.

If you have good insurance, please get tested for Celiac first and then if you test negative (highly probabable) then order the stool test.

How Many Cycles does it take?? 02 Jul 2010 11:57 #4015

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Where and how would I go about doing the Celiac testing? Is that just a simple blood test?

Thanks!

How Many Cycles does it take?? 02 Jul 2010 12:38 #4016

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You need to ask your primary care physician for the Celiac panel. You will find more information down inside the Gluten-free and dairy-free forums but here are the tests that need to be included on the panel. If your primary doc is open to testing you for other blood levels ask for iron, vit D, B6, B12 and folate. These are typically low in people with Celiac and non-Celiac gluten sensitivity.

1) Total Serum IgA - measures the immunogloblins in the blood to make sure the rest of the tests will be valid

2) Anti-gliadin, IgA and IgG (this one is getting older but may still be included- not specific for Celiac but if positive will indicate a gluten sensitivity)

3) Anti-tissue Transglutaminase Antibody (tTG)

4) IgA Anti-endomysial (EMA)

5) Some are also now including a diamidated gliadin peptide test, more specific for Celiac (DPG)

 
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