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TOPIC: (dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 14 Dec 2005 15:48 #3240

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Hi Debra,

I've been gathering a list in my head of foods I have questions about.

Is there any nutritional value to dried fruits? Do they stand-in for fruit at all? I tend to snack on organic dried pineapple and mango, no sugars added.

I keep seeing divine oils and wonder about their efficacy: Sunflower oil, cashew oil, almond oil, coconut oil etc. etc. You had mentioned only using Olive oil and Canola oil. How does one use Flax oil?

I'm from Brazil and love coconut, in any form. I like to cook with coconut milk and drink coconut water all the time (which I've heard is great for cramps, as too is watermellon juice). The saturated fat content of the coconut cream is high. Is it a food to avoid?

And then, finally, corn. I like polenta and wonder about using corn as a grain. Any reservations?

Thanks for your feedback. Best, Alex

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 14 Dec 2005 16:35 #3241

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Hi Alex,

I've been wondering if you were going to contact me. Anyway, glad to see you finally posted.

I'm going to copy and past your questions and answer your very good questions in blue:


I've been gathering a list in my head of foods I have questions about.

Is there any nutritional value to dried fruits? [color=blue:0ef4315835]Yes, however it becomes more concentrated in fructose sugars so be careful not to over eat it.[/color:0ef4315835]
Do they stand-in for fruit at all? [color=blue:0ef4315835]Yes and no, you get more of the natural juices which tend to fill you up. You also lose some antioxidants that oxidize with exposure to air so continue to eat fresh.[/color:0ef4315835]
I tend to snack on organic dried pineapple and mango, no sugars added. [color=blue:0ef4315835]fine, these are high in carbohydrates [/color:0ef4315835]

I keep seeing divine oils and wonder about their efficacy: Sunflower oil, cashew oil, almond oil, coconut oil etc. etc. You had mentioned only using Olive oil and Canola oil.
[color=blue:0ef4315835]The problem with sunflower oil, cashew oil, (please no coconut oil) is the ratio of omega 6 and saturated fats in coconut oil. There are some people who really believe that coconut oils are very healthy, BUT there's really no proof as far as I've seen in the reliable peer reviewed research. The problem in the US is the over use of these omega 6's as well as omega 9's. these tend to lead to the pathway of inflammation, (and pain) hard on the heart and arteries. A very little is fine here and there. Sometimes you can't escape it if you dine out. The Chinese are huge peanut oil and vegetable oil fryers.
The ratios of omega 3's to 6-and 9's is better in olive and canola. These are very beneficial for the body and brain. The omega 3's in fish oil are good because of the available EPA and DHA. [/color:0ef4315835]
How do you use Flax oil? [color=darkblue:0ef4315835]Mostly in salad dressing. You can't cook with it because it deteriorates very rapidly.[/color:0ef4315835]

I'm from Brazil and love coconut, in any form. I like to cook with coconut milk and drink coconut water all the time (which I've heard is great for cramps, as too is watermelon juice). The saturated fat content of the coconut cream is high. Is it a food to avoid? [color=blue:0ef4315835]Coconut water should really be fine, why not switch to the light version of coconut milk if you must have it? If you are using coconut milk are you still having cramps?[/color:0ef4315835]


And then, finally, corn. I like polenta and wonder about using corn as a grain. Any reservations? [color=blue:0ef4315835]None, since you're shooting for gluten free, corn is gluten free and should be great in polenta.[/color:0ef4315835]

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 14 Dec 2005 17:00 #3242

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Thanks, Debra.

That answers my questions beautifully.

I'd been waiting, I guess, for a diet-specific question to arise before officially joining this board. Sorry it took me so long. You will see me around a lot now that I've broken the ice.

No, I haven't noticed cramps with the coconut milk. Funny how that would be bad and coconut water so good for cramps!

Brazil is ahead of the game in research on PMDD, I think, and as I've seen from some of the articles you've posted here. Recently I learned that a good friend in Rio -- who was the only one in my circle of friends to have bad cramps like mine but who I hadn't spoken to in a while -- has been on Vitamin D for two years and is doing great! The diet of course is so much better there, plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables and great great sunlight! So they are really ahead of us and I'd tend to trust their ideas about coconut and watermellon water for cramps.

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 14 Dec 2005 19:21 #3243

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sounds good to me, If we're talking about the same things. The coconut milk that comes in a can (used in many Thai recipes) is very creamy, this is what I'm referring to. This is the milk that contains the saturated fats that lead to an inflammation response. The coconut "water" is the semi-clear liquid that comes out of a freshly opened coconut, does not have the same level of saturated fats as the canned milk. I will look it up the nutrient content on my data base to be sure and post it here.

Regardless, what you chose to believe or ingest is entirely up to you of course.

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 14 Dec 2005 21:54 #3244

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~
Here's the nutritional composition of [b:e458608049]Coconut Milk[/b:e458608049]:

1 cup

557 calories
57g of Total fat
[b:e458608049]50.2g of Saturated fat[/b:e458608049]
.02 of Polyunsat fat
2.4g of monounsat fat
13.3g of Carbohydrate
8g of sugar
5.3g fiber
5.5g protein

also contains a little vitamin C, E, Potassium and magnesium. and 34mg of calcium

[b:e458608049]Coconut water[/b:e458608049] nutritional Composition:

1 cup

45.6 calories
.05g Total fat
.[b:e458608049]04g Sat fat[/b:e458608049]
0 polyunsat fat
0 monounsat fat
8.9g carbohydrate
6.3g sugar
2.6g fiber
1.6g protein
57g calcium

A little vitamin C, magnesium, potassium, B2

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 15 Dec 2005 15:54 #3245

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Thanks, Debra.

I read the labels but am a little confused. So here is a dumb question: Is all saturated fats bad?

Thys Jacobs suggested I needed some fat in my diet and some carbs. We determined that rice was a good source for the carbs and I've been eating it this week with no bodily resistance.

What are the best sources for fat? I imagine fish but what else? I'm not including meat or dairy in my diet (except eggs occassionally and maybe a bit of goat cheese in a salad).

I'm beginning to do some research and to educate myself but if you have some easy sources or explanation, I welcome them.

Thanks again. Alex

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 15 Dec 2005 17:31 #3246

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Hi Alex,

If I could suggest you go back and re-read my website about Fats and PMS, here's the link www.cyclediet.com/fats_pms.php for a quick and easy explanation of fats, good and bad.

You ask if all saturated fats are bad, the answer is "It depends on the Individual who's ingesting them"

Increased saturated fat intake in a person who may be underweight, as an example someone with an eating disorder or someone in a disease state or hyper-metabolic state which requires substantial usable energy, increased saturated fats would be a very good thing. Some one with cystic fibrosis as an example would do very well with increased saturated fats.

Now in normal state individuals who may have substantial energy reserves (body fat), the need for saturated fats is minimal and in fact can be dangerous if lipid profiles are not favorable. Some one with a history of heart disease, arteriosclerosis, or diabetes or insulin resistance, would be best to limit saturated fats. Alcoholics or individuals with liver problems would also be smart to limit saturated fats.

Women with PMS tend to have a poor "balance" of good fats to bad fats, which has been shown to increase production of the reproductive hormones. Estrogen, progesterone as well as testosterone are synthesizes from a cholesterol base, whether produced in the liver or from circulating dietary cholesterol.

Ideally getting the dietary fats in a "better balance" will not only reduce symptoms, but is all around better for the heart. And long-term health in general is all about a healthy heart.

I hope this clears up your question. It's never a simple answer when it comes to saturated fats. As long as you're getting flax seed oil and fish oil at least a couple time a day (1,000-3,000mg), you should be fine.

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 15 Dec 2005 17:48 #3247

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Debra,

I will go back and read about fats as you suggest. Thank you for the link. Your explanation is very clear and very useful. Not sure where I stand on all of it except that the best rule is probably always one of balance and moderation. I'd attempted to cut ALL saturated fats out of my diet but have been finding this rather difficult as I've described. Its good to have better understanding of the issues and I really appreciate your writing on it.

Off to paint my studio and then to do some fatty reading.

Best wishes, Alex

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 15 Dec 2005 17:51 #3248

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Alex,

If you're eating chicken, fish, eggs or goats cheese in regular quantities you are getting plenty of saturated fats.

(dried) fruits, nuts (oils) and others 16 Dec 2005 02:23 #3249

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Alex,

Maybe we need to talk about what you're current diet pattern looks like. I sort of read past the "no meat" post. I'm currently working on a semi-vegetarian pattern for another client which may fit your needs if you're wanting to avoid red meat.

I'm a little concerned you're patterns may be off since you're trying to also avoid gluten.

Let me know if you want talk.
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