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TOPIC: Omega 3's Alternative to Asprin

Omega 3's Alternative to Asprin 10 Oct 2007 00:08 #8769

  • Debra
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I found this looking for a little more info for you regarding asprin as a blood thinner, however one concern taking both asprin and high doses of omega 3 might not be a good idea so do one or the other....not both.

A high dose of omega 3 would be anything over 3,000mg a day.

Is there a safer option than aspirin for preventing heart disease?
Although aspirin is thought of as a blood thinner, what it actually does is reduce inflammation in the blood, particularly C Reactive Protein.

By reducing this inflammation, the blood can flow more easily throughout the body. This blood flow improvement decreases the likelihood of a stroke or heart attack, which is why aspirin is prescribed as a preventative measure as well as a post-incident application.

However, due to the potential side effects of long-term aspirin usage, you may be better off with an aspirin alternative, something that has been proven to reduce inflammation without the adverse reactions.

One such option is fish oil, which contains essential Omega 3 fatty acids and has been shown to reduce inflammation in the blood. It also has numerous other benefits for cardiovascular health and well-being.



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Omega 3's Alternative to Asprin 10 Oct 2007 00:11 #8770

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Safety considerations with omega-3 fatty acid therapy.

Bays HE .
Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40213, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

It has been suggested that the potential antithrombotic effect of fish oils may theoretically increase the risk for bleeding, which may be a safety concern for individual patients. However, clinical trial evidence has not supported increased bleeding with omega-3 fatty acid intake, even when combined with other agents that might also increase bleeding (such as aspirin and warfarin). Another potential safety concern is the susceptibility of omega-3 fatty acid preparations to undergo oxidation, which contributes to patient intolerance and potential toxicity. Finally, large amounts of fish consumption may result in adverse experiences due to the potential presence of environmental toxins such as mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and other contaminants. The risks of exposure to environmental toxins and hypervitaminosis with fish consumption are substantially reduced through purification processes used to develop selected concentrated fish oil supplements and prescription preparations. Thus, in choosing which fish oil therapies to recommend, clinicians should be aware of available information to best assess their relative safety, which includes the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advisory statement regarding fish consumption, the meaning of certain labeling (such as "verification" through the US Pharmacopeia) and the differences in FDA regulatory requirements between nonprescription fish oil supplements and prescription fish oil preparations, and how all of this is important to the optimal treatment of patients.

PMID: 17368277 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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