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Discuss topics concerning pregnancy, fertility and reproductive issues. Registered members only
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TOPIC: Fertility Foods

Fertility Foods 05 Mar 2011 01:28 #8901

  • lzalvis
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So while I"m in this 'waiting' phase after my miscarriage, I found a book called Fertility Foods by Dr. Jeremy Groll.  I usually take these things with a grain of salt, but a lot of what he talked about is similar to what I've learned here.  He basically talks about pairing up slow-release complex carbs with lean protein to keep your blood sugars and insulin levels even keel.  A light bulb went on!

This led me to some research on the glycemic index in general, and I realized that this could really be an area of huge work for me.  when doing GF-Low-GI food research, I started looking at all my GF foods, and was surprised that they are all mostly made of high GI flours - tapioca, potato, white rice, etc. 

So I'd like to put forth some extra effort in using gluten free recipes that focus on lower GI flours.  I think brown rice, sorghum, beans, oats are all good.  And then I discovered almond flour too...

anyway, I'm going to start making a conscious effort toward this lower GI-lean protein thing.  It's amazing how it's not really that hard, it just takes a little bit of knowledge and application on my part (and knowing is half the battle :-).

Fertility Foods 05 Mar 2011 12:58 #8902

  • lzalvis
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Hi Lara,

Yes there is some evidence that a low glycemic diet may aid in fertility....especially for those with PCOS or the possibility of polycystic ovaries or metabolic syndrome (pre-diabetes). You could go even a bit further by suggesting that the white processed flours have little to no nutrients left behind. Regular white wheat flour is enriched with many or more than what was originally there such as niacin, riboflavin, thiamine, iron. Gluten-free flours are not enriched or fortified so it's important to make sure the grains that you do eat are whole. This may change in the future but for now I do think it's a good idea to stay with those whole GF grains and stay away from as much processed white sugar or white flour.
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