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TOPIC: Does Anyone Smoke?

Does Anyone Smoke? 04 Jan 2006 13:38 #4136

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~
No judgements here if you do, but know that it does affect your hormones. I myself am a former smoker during my younger days. Here's the abstract and link to medline on a new study of reproductive hormones and smoking:

[b:b4c13071ab]Cigarette Smoking and Effects on Hormone Function in Premenopausal Women[/b:b4c13071ab]

Gayle C. Windham; Patrick Mitchell; Meredith Anderson; Bill L. Lasley

Environ Health Perspect. 2005;113(10):1285-1290. ?2005 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Posted 10/12/2005

Abstract and Introduction
[b:b4c13071ab]Abstract[/b:b4c13071ab]
Cigarette smoke contains compounds that are suspected to cause reproductive damage and possibly affect hormone activity; therefore, we examined hormone metabolite patterns in relation to validated smoking status. We previously conducted a prospective study of women of reproductive age (n = 403) recruited from a large health maintenance organization, who collected urine daily during an average of three to four menstrual cycles. Data on covariates and daily smoking habits were obtained from a baseline interview and daily diary, and smoking status was validated by cotinine assay.Urinary metabolite levels of estrogen and progesterone were measured daily throughout the cycles. For the present study, we measured urinary levels of the pituitary hormonefollicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in a subset of about 300 menstrual cycles, selected by smoking status, with the time of transition between two cycles being of primary interest.Compared with nonsmokers, moderate to heavy smokers (?10 cigarettes/day) had baseline levels (e.g., early follicular phase) of both steroid metabolites that were 25-35% higher, and heavy smokers (?20 cigarettes/day) had lower luteal-phase progesterone metabolite levels. The mean daily urinary FSH levels around the cycle transition were increased at least 30-35% with moderate smoking, even after adjustment. These patterns suggest that chemicals in tobacco smoke alter endocrine function, perhaps at the level of the ovary, which in turn effects release of the pituitary hormones. This endocrine disruption likely contributes to the reported associations of smoking with adverse reproductive outcomes, including menstrual dysfunction, infertility, and earlier menopause.

Link to the rest of the research article.
www.medscape.com/viewarticle/514240_print

Does Anyone Smoke? 07 Jan 2006 15:43 #4137

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I did, and can certainly see how the results of this study are true to life. Quitting was one of the most difficult, yet best things I ever did. Now, I'm working on the rest of my body!

Does Anyone Smoke? 28 Jan 2006 22:34 #4138

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[b:10a261db92]Eating Foods With ?Weak Estrogens? May Help Reduce Lung Cancer Risk[/b:10a261db92]

Eating vegetables and other foods that have weak estrogen-like activity appears to reduce the risk of developing lung cancer in smokers ? as well as in non-smokers, say researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

In the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the investigators report that study participants who ate the highest amount of foods with dietary ?phytoestrogens? had a 46% reduced risk of developing lung cancer, compared to those who ate the lowest quantity. More than 3,500 people participated in the research ? making it the largest case-controlled study to examine dietary phytoestrogens and lung cancer risk in a U. S. population, according to the researchers.
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