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Articles and research studies related to PCOS. This forum is open to the public. PCOS is an autoimmune condition.
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TOPIC: Ovarian Cysts and Vitamin D

Ovarian Cysts and Vitamin D 01 Dec 2005 03:09 #765

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Vitamin D and calcium dysregulation in the polycystic ovarian syndrome
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Thys-Jacobs S, Donovan D, Papadopoulos A, Sarrel P, Bilezikian JP.

Department of Medicine, St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY 10019, USA.

Over the past 30 years, numerous studies in invertebrates and vertebrates have established a role of calcium in oocyte maturation as well as in the resumption and progression of follicular development. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCO) is characterized by hyperandrogenic chronic anovulation, theca cell hyperplasia, and arrested follicular development. The aim of this observational study was to determine whether vitamin D and calcium dysregulation contribute to the development of follicular arrest in women with PCO, resulting in reproductive and menstrual dysfunction. Thirteen premenopausal women (mean age 31 +/- 7.9 years) with documented chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism were evaluated. Four women were amenorrheic and nine had a history oligomenorrhea, two of whom had dysfunctional bleeding. Nine had abnormal pelvic sonograms with multiple ovarian follicular cysts. All were hirsute, two had alopecia, and five had acanthosis nigricans. The mean 25 hydrovitamin D was 11.2 +/- 6.9 ng/ml [normal (nl): 9-52], and the mean 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D was 45.8 +/- 18 pg/ml. with one woman with a 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D <5 pg/ml (nl: 15-60). The mean intact parathyroid hormone level was 47 +/- 19 pg/ml (nl: 10-65), with five women with abnormally elevated parathyroid hormone levels. All were normocalcemic (9.3 +/- 0.4 mg/dl). Vitamin D repletion with calcium therapy resulted in normalized menstrual cycles within 2 months for seven women, with two experiencing resolution of their dysfunctional bleeding. Two became pregnant, and the other four patients maintained normal menstrual cycles. These data suggest that abnormalities in calcium homeostasis may be responsible, in part, for the arrested follicular development in women with PCO and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PCO.

PMID: 10433180 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The above is all about ovarian cysts and decreased amounts of Vit D. Very informative too.

Nicole

Ovarian Cysts and Vitamin D 04 Dec 2007 14:34 #766

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Thanks Nicole,

Some very good information! I'm so glad you're looking for more information on vitamin D and thinking of us here. This article is by Dr. Susan Thys-Jacobs, who is also one of the top researcher on calcium and vitamin D in women with PMS and PMDD.

FYI....PCOS is also considered an autoimmune diesease which are known to increase the need for vitamin D.

Ovarian Cysts and Vitamin D 09 Jul 2008 18:06 #767

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Actually, it is not an autoimmune disorder.

It's a metabolic/endocrine disorder.

Our cells are not attacking one another. PCOS is because there's excess free-floating insulin in our blood which in turn creates excess androgens (male sex hormones), creating a lot of the symptoms of PCOS, like unwanted hair growth, male pattern baldness, irregular/absent periods, and infertility.

Ovarian Cysts and Vitamin D 09 Jul 2008 19:42 #768

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[user=569]splashsmama[/user] wrote:

Actually, it is not an autoimmune disorder.

It's a metabolic/endocrine disorder.

Our cells are not attacking one another. PCOS is because there's excess free-floating insulin in our blood which in turn creates excess androgens (male sex hormones), creating a lot of the symptoms of PCOS, like unwanted hair growth, male pattern baldness, irregular/absent periods, and infertility.



I beg to differ my friend....it may be known primarily as a metabolic/endocrine disorder due to available treatments to the signs & symptoms, but it can certainly be considered autoimmune and is indeed considered a consequence of autoimmunity with many PCOS and autoimmune researchers. And yes antibodies can and do develop due to intestinal permeability caused by high hormone levels which go on to attack many body tissues including the ovaries. What's interesting is many researchers have made the connection between autoimmune diseases and PCOS. Have you noticed how many Celiacs or gluten sensitive women also have PCOS? Have you notice how many women with Type 1 diabetes (autoimmune) also develop PCOS? How about women with Lupus or MS or Rheumatoid arthritis, Thyroiditis and PCOS?

Take your situation as an example.....which do you think came first, your genetic predisposition to gluten intolerance or PCOS? Or do you think your genetic predisposition to PCOS caused the gluten or dairy intolerance? Researchers making the connection understand it's something in the immune system that may be triggered by the endocrine system.  Autoimmune? You Bet!

See this link for more research regarding PCOS and Autoimmune

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