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What is Gluten and Dairy Intolerance? What is the difference between an allergy and intolerance/sensitivity. Latest medical research. Open to the public.

TOPIC: Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 05 Nov 2007 12:27 #476

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Al,

Hijack, Hijack, Hijack please.....thanks again for your expert knowledge and contribution.

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 06 Nov 2007 21:42 #477

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Al,

Do you have any doctor recommendations for the LA area? I saw my doctor yesterday and got an "its all in your head" response that I really didn't like. His suggestion was to take magnesium.

I'll peruse your website for doctors' recommendations as well. But if you happen to know of anyone working in the field who is local, I'd really appreciate it.

Representing myself with these symptoms is just getting harder with these neurological symptoms.

Thanks,
Alex

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 06 Nov 2007 22:30 #478

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Hi Alex,

Take a look thru celiac.org/index.php They are based in Studio City - not sure how close that is, but I'd venture to guess it's close.

They might be able to get you pointed in the right direction.

Yeah...it's all in your head...heard that many many many [did I say many? :)] times. Not only in my own appts, but in others that I know. I wouldn't disagree with his/her suggestion on magnessium .

Keep pushin'...Keep pushin'...Keep pushin' on...

Al

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 06 Nov 2007 23:42 #479

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Thanks so much, Al.

I've got an appointment with a new primary tomorrow (bringing it around to health insurance) and hopefully they'll make good referrals and I'll get this figured out soon enough. I'm always so hopeful.

I'll also start taking the magnesium and see if that helps. My bloodpressure is already so low my doctor always asks if I don't feel like feinting. Often I do.

Thanks again,
Alex

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 07 Nov 2007 00:10 #480

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al,
celiac foundation was great. thanks for that tip. they've given me names of gi and a support group here in la too.

this has been very very helpful.
alex

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 07 Nov 2007 00:12 #481

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That's great news!!

Good luck in your Knowledge Quest!!

Al

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 14 Nov 2007 16:34 #482

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Yes, this was me too always falling over stuff and the bed spinning. I had no idea it was tied to gluten. I just thought it was my hormones going wacko. Looks like I also have a lot of reading to do.

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 15 Nov 2007 01:41 #483

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you say this was you....have you found some relief from it?

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 15 Nov 2007 15:49 #484

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[user=12]Bast[/user] wrote:

you say this was you....have you found some relief from it?


Well, I have seen some relief, not sure if it's from eating a better balanced diet or if it could be related to the gluten. I have a feeling it could be the gluten after reading about the effects here. I really don't know, but my brain and thought process seems to be much clearer. I just hope I don't have irreversible damage talked about in one of those articles. Come to think of it, I have been sleeping better, deeper as well which may also help my thinking. I was so exausted and groggy all the time and now I feel like I have so much more energy. Getting the house work done was not a priority. I will have to start paying closer attention now. I've only really focused on the depression and pain.

Neurological Celiac disease- Neurological symptoms 19 Nov 2007 18:32 #485

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B12 Deficiency

my doc reports that i have a mild vitamin b12 deficiency.
she requests that i buy a b12 that gets absorbed directly into the skin.

•••

More severe cases can give vitamin b12 deficiency symptoms, which include:

* Numbness or tingling in the hands or feet
••* Insomnia
••* Loss of memory
••* Dizziness
* Lack of balance
••* Depression
••* Digestive problems
* Liver enlargement
* Eye problems
••* Headaches
* Hallucinations
* Inflamed tongue
••* Breathing difficulties
* Palpitations
••* Neurological damage
* Tinitus or ringing in the ears

What causes vitamin B12 deficiency anemia?

Most people get more than enough B12 from eating meat, eggs, milk, and cheese. Normally, the vitamin is absorbed by your digestive system-your stomach and intestines. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia usually happens when the digestive system is not able to absorb the vitamin.

This can happen if:

* You have pernicious anemia. In this anemia, your body destroys the cells in your stomach that help you absorb vitamin B12.

* You have problems with the way your body digests food, such as sprue (also called celiac disease), Crohn's disease, bacteria growth in the small intestine, or a parasite.

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/vitamin-b12-deficiency-anemia-topic-overview



What are the symptoms?

If your vitamin B12 deficiency is mild, you may not have symptoms or you may not notice them. Some people may think they are just the result of growing older. As the anemia gets worse, you may:

* Feel weak, tired, and lightheaded.
* Have pale skin.
* Have a sore, red tongue or bleeding gums.
* Feel sick to your stomach and lose weight.
* Have diarrhea or constipation.

If the level of vitamin B12 stays low for a long time, it can damage your nerve cells. If this happens, you may have:

* Numbness or tingling in your fingers and toes.
* A poor sense of balance.
* Depression.
* Dementia, a loss of mental abilities.

Vitamin B12 deficiency can develop for the following reasons:

* Absence of intrinsic factor, also called pernicious anemia — Intrinsic factor is a protein secreted by cells of the stomach lining. Intrinsic factor attaches to vitamin B12 and takes it to the intestines to be absorbed. An absence of intrinsic factor is the most common cause of pernicious anemia.

Pernicious anemia occurs more commonly in people who already have diseases that are linked to immune-system abnormalities, such as Graves' disease, hypothyroidism (under-functioning thyroid gland), thyroiditis (inflammation of the thyroid), vitiligo and Addison's disease (adrenocortical insufficiency).
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/9339/20862.html


The diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency has traditionally been based on low serum vitamin B12 levels, usually less than 200 pg per mL (150 pmol per L), along with clinical evidence of disease. ...

Causes of vitamin B12 deficiency can be divided into three classes: nutritional deficiency, malabsorption syndromes, and other gastrointestinal causes (Table 2). Normally, humans maintain a large vitamin B12 reserve, which can last two to five years even in the presence of severe malabsorption. Nevertheless, nutritional deficiency can occur in specific populations. Elderly patients with "tea and toast" diets and chronic alcoholics are at especially high risk. The dietary limitations of strict vegans make them another, less common at-risk population.

Vitamin B12 deficiency also has been linked to psychiatric disorders, including impaired memory, irritability, depression, dementia and, rarely, psychosis. http://www.aafp.org/afp/20030301/979.html


Possible Complications

* The signs and symptoms related to the central nervous system may be irreversible if treatment is not begun within 6 months of when these symptoms begin.
* Vitamin B12 affects epithelial cells (cells that form the outer surface of the body and line inner passageways). Therefore, a lack of B12 may cause a false-positive Pap smear. [!!!]

Symptoms

* Loss of appetite
* Diarrhea
* Numbness and tingling of hands and feet
* Paleness
* Shortness of breath
* Fatigue
* Weakness
* Sore mouth and tongue
* Confusion or change in mental status in severe or advanced cases
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000574.htm

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