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What is Gluten and Dairy Intolerance? What is the difference between an allergy and intolerance/sensitivity. Latest medical research. Open to the public.
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TOPIC: Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness

Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness 24 Jan 2007 16:57 #500

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Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 2002;72:560-563
� 2002
Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry  

[font=arial,verdana,helvetica]EDITORIAL[/font]

[size=+1]Gluten sensitivity[/size]

Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness
M Hadjivassiliou, R A Gr�newald and G A B Davies-Jones

[size=-1]Department of Neurology, The Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JF, UK [/size]

[size=-1]Correspondence to:
Dr M Hadjivassiliou, Department of Neurology, The Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JF, UK;
m.hadjivassiliou@sheffield.ac.uk

[/size]

THE NEUROLOGY OF GLUTEN SENSITIVITY
Over the past 8 years we have used antigliadin antibodies to screen patients with neurological dysfunction of unknown aetiology. Our original study concluded that gluten sensitivity played an important part in neurological illness.17[/url] The evidence was statistical: Patients with neurological disease of unknown aetiology were found to have a much higher prevalence of circulating antigliadin antibodies (57%) in their blood than either healthy control subjects (12%) or those with neurological disorders of known aetiology (5%). Since then we have identified 131 patients with gluten sensitivity and neurological disorders of unknown aetiology. Table 2
shows the neurological diagnoses we have encountered. Perhaps not surprisingly the commonest manifestations are ataxia (also known as gluten ataxia 18 ) and peripheral neuropathy. 19

http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/72/5/560

the full article is available at the link above

Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness 24 Jan 2007 17:07 #501

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Anyone with a double HLA DQ1 will also want to read the above article

IgG anti-gliadin antibodies have been the best diagnostic marker in the neurological population we have studied. IgG anti-gliadin antibodies have a very high sensitivity for CD but they are said to lack specificity. In the context of a range of mucosal abnormalities and the concept of potential CD, they may be the only available immunological marker for the whole range of gluten sensitivity of which CD is only a part. Further support for our contention comes from our HLA studies. Within the group of patients with neurological disease and gluten sensitivity (defined by the presence of anti-gliadin antibodies) we have found a similar HLA association to that seen in patients with CD: 70% of patients have the HLA DQ2 (30% in the general population), 9% have the HLA DQ8, and the remainder have HLA DQ1. The finding of an additional HLA marker (DQ1) seen in the remaining 20% of our patients may represent an important difference between the genetic susceptibility of patients with neurological presentation to those with gastrointestinal presentation within the range of gluten sensitivity.

Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness 31 Oct 2007 14:37 #502

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More research referencing Dr. Hadjivassiliou

I couldn't decide where to post this article since it's related to gluten and neurological function so I will post in a couple places...this article is written by Dr. Scott Lewey a gastroenterologist who does recognize non-celiac gluten intolerance/sensitivity.

If you're close to Colorado Springs and need a good GI doc his contact information is included in this article:

Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance Linked to Brain Disease By Deposits in the Brain and Intestines

Antibodies for tissue transglutaminase found in the intestines of blood test negative celiac disease patients are also found in the intestine and brain in people with brain disease due to gluten. Gluten ataxia is a brain disorder characterized by balance disturbances not explained by any other cause but due to the ingestion of gluten. The disorder responds to a gluten free diet if irreversible brain damage has not already occurred. Calcifications can be seen in the brain on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Deposits of gluten related antibodies have been found in brain tissue obtained on biopsy and autopsy specimens. Mario Hadjivassiliou, M.D. from Sheffield England recommends gluten ataxia be added to a list of gluten related diseases that includes peripheral neuropathy and the skin disorder dermatitis herpetiformis. He has called for a new paradigm to be accepted where celiac disease is not considered primarily as an intestinal disease.

Dr. Hadjivassiliou and colleagues recently published a report of nine patients with gluten ataxia compared with seven patients with ataxia due to other causes. They found tissue transglutaminase IgA deposition on jejunum intestinal tissue on all nine patients with gluten ataxia but none of the control patients. Brain tissue from an autopsy of one patient with gluten ataxia was also found to have IgA tTG deposits in the cerebellum, pons and medulla of the brain but not in a control brain.

Previous studies have found negative celiac blood tests in patients with gluten ataxia suggesting that they may not have celiac though they had a gluten related disease. In light of a new report that blood test negative celiac disease can have intestinal tTG and advanced intestinal damage it is curious to wonder if the gluten ataxia patients with blood tests negative are seronegative celiacs. It is increasingly appearing that there is a very broad spectrum of gluten related disease and there are non-celiac gluten related symptoms that include the brain, skin, musculoskeletal system as well as the gut.

Many patients I have seen with gluten sensitivity describe symptoms of balance difficulty, concentration problems or “brain fog”, headaches, and neuropathy and a few report symptoms such as “bug crawling” sensations and strange muscle twitches. These symptoms commonly improve with a gluten-free diet and return with intentional or accidental gluten exposure. For some, intestinal symptoms or skin rashes occur but not all. The concept of gluten as a cause of brain symptoms is still not one widely known or accepted by many doctors, especially in the United States. However in Europe, especially England, Germany and Scandinavian countries, as well as Australia and New Zealand the gluten brain-gut connection is more accepted.

Casein causing brain symptoms is also not commonly accepted by doctors in the U.S. though many lay public organizations and support groups have found a casein-free diet to be associated with improvement of brain function as well as helping autism.

What is needed is more openness of U.S. doctors to the role of diet and foods in such symptoms and diseases and much more scientific research. I ask you to join me on the journey of the food, bacteria, gut-brain-joint-skin connection to disease and health  

References:

Autoantibody targeting of brain and intestinal transglutaminase in gluten ataxia. Hadjivassiliou M. et. al. Neurology 2006; 66:373-377.

Endomysial antibody-negative coeliac disease: clinical characteristics and intestinal autoantibody deposits. Gut 2006; 55:1746-1753.



The Food Doc, Dr. Scot Lewey, is an expert medical doctor specializing in digestive diseases and food related illness, especially food allergies, celiac disease and colitis. Dr. Lewey's expert reputation as the Food Doc is established by a foundation of formal training in internal medicine, pediatrics, and gastroenterology (diseases of the digestive tract), his personal and family experience with gluten and milk sensitivity, and over two decades as a practicing physician, clinical researcher, author and speaker. Access this expert knowledge online today at http://www.thefooddoc.com

 

Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness 01 Nov 2007 08:09 #503

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debra, thank you so much for posting these articles. if you find any more information that describes "symptoms of balance difficulty, concentration problems or “brain fog”, headaches, and neuropathy and a few report symptoms such as “bug crawling” sensations and strange muscle twitches" would you alert us to them? i'm especially interested in the loss of concentration and memory that i seem to be afflicted with during my luteal period. it seems as though i am losing my mind. though i've always experienced a loss of coordination, i recently have also experienced the twitching and acheing of muscle and skin, or pain in my veins, particularly along my legs. that physical sensation a few days before my period was so bad it would wake me and keep me up all night. thanks again for the research. a

Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness 01 Nov 2007 14:02 #505

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You can read a personal essay regarding neurological Celiac and how gluten can affect the brain here:

 

Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness 19 Nov 2007 20:40 #504

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This is a re-post of Al's aka... Alkap from the Gluten Free/Celiac forum on Neurological effects of gluten, I thought this would also be a good place for it, just in case some don't get to that forum. Thanks again Al You may notice the same article as above in the list.


Hi Deb,

Interesting [and frustrating story] and all too common, sadly :(

I just thought I share this with the board...I know it might be a bit technical, but if people walk away with the mere fact that "gluten can affect something other than the gut"...that's a start!

Dr. Hadjivassiliou is a neurologist in the UK at The Royal Hallamshire Hospital . He has done extensive work in the neurological aspects of how gluten affects the body.

A special thanks to my friend Anne for assembling these articles.


Myopathy associated with gluten sensitivity, Dec 2006
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17143894&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docsum

Dietary treatment of gluten neuropathy. Sept 2006
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=17013890&query_hl=28&itool=pubmed_docsum


Neuropathy associated with gluten sensitivity, Nov 2006
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=16835287&query_hl=29&itool=pubmed_docsum

Autoantibody targeting of brain and intestinal transglutaminase in gluten ataxia. Feb 2006
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=16476935&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Cerebellar abnormalities on proton MR spectroscopy in gluten ataxia. July 2005 - free full text
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15965215&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Are lower gastrointestinal investigations necessary in patients with coeliac disease? Jun 2005
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15879723&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Multiple sclerosis and occult gluten sensitivity. Mar 2005
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15753454&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Making the diagnosis of coeliac disease: is there a role for push enteroscopy? Nov 2004
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15489573&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

The immunology of gluten sensitivity: beyond the gut. Nov 2004
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15489185&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Gluten sensitivity masquerading as systemic lupus erythematosus. Nov 2004 - free full text
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15479903&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

The Neurology of Gluten Sensitivity: Science vs. Conviction
http://pn.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/4/2/124 - Free full text

Choreic syndrome and coeliac disease: a hitherto unrecognised association, Apr 2004
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15077250&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Dietary treatment of gluten ataxia. Sept 2003 - free full text
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=12933922&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

A primary care cross-sectional study of undiagnosed adult coeliac disease. Apr 2003
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=12655262&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Gluten ataxia in perspective: epidemiology, genetic susceptibility and clinical characteristics. Mar 2003 - free full text
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=12566288&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Gluten Sensitivity: Time to move from Gut to Brain. Jan/Feb 2003 - full text
http://www.acnr.co.uk/pdfs/volume2issue6/v2i6reviewart2.pdf

The humoral response in the pathogenesis of gluten ataxia. Apr 2002
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=11971090&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness. May 2002 - free full text - Excellent overview article
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=11971034&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Headache and CNS white matter abnormalities associated with gluten sensitivity. Feb 2001
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=11171906&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Gluten sensitivity: a many headed hydra. Jun 1999 - free full text
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=10381684&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Clinical, radiological, neurophysiological, and neuropathological characteristics of gluten ataxia. Nov 1998
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=9843103&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Neuromuscular disorder as a presenting feature of coeliac disease. Dec 1997 - free full text
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=pubmed&cmd=Retrieve&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=9416814&query_hl=4&itool=pubmed_docsum

Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Feb 1996
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8598704&dopt=Citation

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