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What is Gluten and Dairy Intolerance? What is the difference between an allergy and intolerance/sensitivity. Latest medical research. Open to the public.
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TOPIC: My experience

My experience 30 Jun 2006 04:18 #1132

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HI, I"ve been away for awhile, but have learned a ton in the mean time. I am able to go on a gluten free diet for several weeks at a time now with good noticeable changes. Stools change, less fatigues, less nauseated, less stomach pain and cramps, head feels more clear and overall a better feeling.

We are currently, slowly, switching my 7 year old daughter over to a gluten free diet too. She's complained of a stomach since I can remember. So, I see a decrease in her stomach complaints as well. When she wants to eat what she wants, there is a huge increase in pains as well as bathroom trips.

It's so hard to have a change in diet like this. It takes much time and preparation and support. But so worth it in the long run.......I"ve been slacking the last two weeks and I am paying for it again. ie, diarrhea, sever cramps with and before bowel movements, nausea and a general blah feeling in my belly and intestines.

Hope this can help someone else here. :)
Nicole

My experience 13 Jul 2006 21:23 #1133

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Nicole,

I'm sorry I missed this post somehow, but I wanted to thank you so much for posting this message. I hope you will share with the other gluten free members what to look for when purchasing processed foods.

I have been making subtle changes to the website noting gluten containing foods and grains. I've also been working on a preliminary "gluten free" Cycle Diet. The recipes can also be easily adjusted to gluten free by using gluten free cereals, pasta and breads.

The Original Cycle Diet can also easily be changed to gluten free once you know what to be aware of. But as you know it's a very steep learning curve.

Please post your favorite recipes or links to your favorite recipes if you'd like.

Glad you came back to visit. Hope to see more from you.

My experience 10 Sep 2006 22:07 #1134

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HI,
Well, my 7 year old last year complained of so many stomach aches. And frankly, she'd complained of them ever since she could talk. So, hubby and I decided to try to significantly derease her gluten after school was out. That was in mid June.
Now, she is taking a lunch and doing GREAT!!!!! She's mostly gluten free now, but on special occasions we both tend to have a little treat. Then, of course we are in the bathroom frequently after that.
This is the cheap method.
When we do have gluten now, we know we will feel ucky and it happens less and less.
My 2 cents worth.
Nicole

My experience 11 Sep 2006 14:45 #1135

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Hi Nicole,

It's so good to hear from you. :D Yes, now you understand how damaging gluten is for you and your daughter. You should [b:af357dca10]always[/b:af357dca10] try to stay away from it. Even just a little can cause intestinal damage. It's like picking a scab over and over. It can take over a year to heal a severely damaged intestine.

My new understanding is many more people are gluten sensitive yet test negative. Have you ever received a positive diagnosis?

Thank you very much for sharing your experiences and recipes.

My experience 11 Sep 2006 16:36 #1136

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HI Deb,
Oooooo, picking a scab....makes me make faces. EWW! It sort of feels that way too in my lower left intestinal area.

Anyway, that's exactly what my rheumatologist said. That many are gluten sensitive, but still can test negative..........either by blood work or internal exams. I"ve never recieved an "offical" diagnosis. The rheumy said we can do it the cheep way or the expensive way (which most likely will be inconclusive).
Remember about a year ago I had an endoscopy done and I had stomach linning swelling. But doc didn't know why.

Nicole

My experience 11 Sep 2006 17:42 #1137

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Nicole,

Have you ever thought about an Enterolabs test- Non invasive stool sample and genetic testing for you and your family?

My experience 15 Sep 2006 17:58 #1138

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HI Deb,
I dont knw what the Enterolabs test- are. I have had some test done when I was in college. Where I had to bring in a stool sample and they always told me it was gastointestinalitis. WHen I student taght, I was so ill that semester, I had to go to the hospital and the doc kept giving me aciiphilus from behind the counter.
Will you tell me more about that test?
Nicole

My experience 15 Sep 2006 19:46 #1139

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Hi Nicole,

I would have thought you might have seen a reference to Enterolab on Celiac.com. Anyway, Dr. Kenneth Fine of Dallas, Texas who is a board certified Gastroenterologist has invented an assay- lab test, to determine gluten sensitivity through a stool sample via overnight express service. His tests are able to pick up on malabsorbed food particles, IgA, IgG and other peptides associated with food allergies, intolerances and the level of sensitivity by a numerical quantity. He also tests for other food intolerances (i.e. casein, egg, soy, corn, and other foods commonly known to cause an immune response)

I'm not absolutely sure if the genetic testing is done at his lab or if he sends it out from his lab to another lab. But learning about the genetic predisposition to gluten sensitivity I think would be very good to know, especially for your children's sake.

You can check out his website at www.enterolab.com for more information.

Please let me know if you order any of his tests, I'd be very interested in knowing what shows up on your results.

My experience 17 Sep 2006 01:54 #1140

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OK, I ordered two of Test A, $369 each. One for me and one for Megan (daughter). You've always been right from the start, so I am giving this a try. I am interested too.
I have seen some references to Entrololab, but sort of looked over it due to not really knowing much about it. But since you think it worthy, then I believe it.

Nicole

My experience 17 Sep 2006 12:48 #1141

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Nicole,

Be sure and read through the website too, there's some great information about how and why they test with stool samples that make such common sense that I'm wondering why more gastroenterologists don't try and develop their own assays for malabsorption.

Anyway I believe Dr. Kenneth Fine is ahead of his time in this area of testing. It's just too bad he hasn't yet licensed his assay so more physicians can use it for their patients.

Thanks for your vote of confidence in me as well. Please let me know how it goes.
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