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What is Gluten and Dairy Intolerance? What is the difference between an allergy and intolerance/sensitivity. Latest medical research. Open to the public.

TOPIC: Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 15 Jan 2009 17:06 #556

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I haven't seen this myself yet, but I want to track it down. I believe it's an article by Nutritionist Melissa Diane Smith in her Go Gluten Free column.

Debra have you seen this article?

The picture of celiac disease is changing, and non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which affects considerably more people, is gradually being acknowledged...

Skepticism in the conventional medical community still exists regarding gluten sensitivity that isn't celiac disease, but the condition is slowly being recognized. In 2005, the Gluten Intolerance Group developed a medically approved handout on gluten sensitivity. During the past few years, Web sites with a primary or exclusive focus on gluten sensitivity have developed. Last year, Alessio Fasano, MD, medical director of the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research, published research on gluten sensitivity. He recently said that there is "no question" that gluten sensitivity affects considerably more people than celiac disease does and that 60 to 70 percent of the patients who come to the Center for Celiac Research appear to have gluten sensitivity. He and other researchers are conducting more research to better define the condition and find new ways to test for it.

...Human beings aren't alone in having nonceliac gluten sensitivity. Rhesus monkeys, which are genetically similar to human beings, have it too. One study found that many captive rhesus monkeys that were fed a food with gluten had symptoms such as diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, depression, and skin rashes and blistering. Nearly all of those had elevated IgA and/or IgG antigliadin antibodies, which are indicators of gluten sensitivity. Only a few tested positive for celiac disease. When the animals were fed gluten-free food, their antibody levels normalized and symptoms disappeared.


This is a kind of reversal from Dr. Fasano. To my knowledge he never acknowledge gluten sensitivity up until recently. As I've said in the past - things are slowly changing. :D

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 15 Jan 2009 17:55 #557

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Hi Al,

Yes, I believe Melissa Diane Smith is really getting out there pushing her book and website "Going Against The Grain". She writes a blog for people who are following the GF diet, or rather her GF "Going Against the Grain Diet" which I believe is more of a very low carb-mostly all grain free diet. You'll find more info here.  Although she calls herself a "nutritionist" she is not an RD or MS in nutrition (which would be in my opinion a real nutritionist). She states on her website that she has an undergrad degree in nutrition from The University of Arizona but also states she has an advanced training degree from a questionable institute known as The American Academy of Nutrition . Here's what quack watch says about this institute .

Although there's nothing wrong with being an "informed Health Writer", which is really what she is, she doesn't hold the proper credentials in my opinion to be promoting or doing nutrition counseling with anyone with Celiac, Diabetes, or an Autoimmune condition... you need a license in all but 3 states to do this. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't see that she has a State certificate or license to do medical nutrition counseling. She loses all credibility in my eyes because of this. And unfortuately is then brushed off by the mainstream medical community in the quest for non-celiac gluten sensitivity to be taken seriously! Sorry. 

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 15 Jan 2009 23:33 #559

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Hmmm, interesting...

My focus of this article was really on what Dr. Fasano has stated. Do you think that she has misrepresented what he said/believes? I know that she is correct about the GIG handout. I know from other articles/reports, that Dr. Fasano has made other similar comments about GS. I can't speak about the monkeys as I have not seen any research data [only because I haven't looked for it].

One question comes to mind...In your eyes how does Dr. Fine (Enterolab) stack up? Wouldn't he be in similar boat? Dr. Fine [while he is a board cert. gastro], has not published any info for peer review. His credibility is questioned constantly by mainstream medicine and skeptics alike. He has proven nothing about his testing. It too could be pure quackery.

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 16 Jan 2009 04:18 #560

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Hi Al,

I've never seen Better Nutrition magazine before....and I really can't say whether or not what she says Dr. Fasano says in an interview is true, the only person who can verify that is Dr. Fasano. It wouldn't surprise me if he acknowledged gluten sensitivity to her for her article, he basically said that in his interview with Trisha Thompson M.S. R.D. and during his talk at the Digestive Disease week conference.

The problem I have with her is her misrepresentation of an advanced degree from nothing more than a "pay for diploma" non-accredited, non-school, diploma mill. She doesn't have a license or certification to practice medical nutrition. She could face some pretty hefty fines for practicing or soliciting in states that require licensure. If a person is willing to put forth a fake diploma or credential, how much stock or creditable do you give that person? Not much IMHO, It's very disappointing.

As far as Dr. Fine goes, he has a license to practice medicine in Texas with an advanced gastroenterology specialty. His stool test may be the only questionable issue to his peers, which seems to be gaining acceptance. He has a long list of peer reviewed published research on the subject of gastroenterology and the diseases of the intestines. I don't see Dr. Fine misrepresenting his education or legality to practice his profession.


I think what you're looking for is some kind of confirmation of the article that appears in "Better Nutrition Magazine" is this a pay for magazine or a give-a-way you pick up at your health food store. The kind of magazine with weird herbs and weight loss potions. Where did you get the article in the first place? You might want to ask them to look up the references.

But if you look at the end of the blog article I gave you a link to you will find a reference: This is not an original research article but a "review article" You should ask your friend Anne if she has access to this publication for the full copy to see what it actually says.

Reference: Catassi C, Fasano A. Is this really celiac disease? Pitfalls in diagnosis. Current Gastroenterology Reports, 2008;10;466-472.

One last thing....ask Peg how she feels about other nurses practicing in her office without the proper credintials or license.

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 16 Jan 2009 16:36 #561

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Hi Debra,

First off - I'm not doing this just to pick a fight. :) I am playing Devil's Advocate on Dr. Fine, though.

I can't argue the credibility of the schools in which Ms. Smith holds her degrees from. I have not researched them or the background of Ms. Smith.

My point in posting the above article was not prove or disprove Ms. Smith knowledge or credentials, but merely to reiterate that we are seeing advances in the knowledge and acceptance of gluten sensitivity. Particularly from a doctor that had a strict view of what celiac disease/gluten intolerance was [villi damage or bust]. Perhaps I should've posted Ms Thompson's blog entry on Fasano's interview instead. .

I do understand the reasoning and concepts of licensing medical personnel. If you didn't, you'd have thousands of Grannies running around with the jugs of Rheumatis Medicine and Hog Fat & Squirrel Tail poultaces. Wait...I think some still do this... ;) Yes, we do need some standards, rules and regs.

I think you and I have both been around the block enough to know that the piece paper [aka The License], is not necessarily a valid indicator of how good they are as a health care provider...or...how much and what type of knowledge they do have. I'm sure you see evidence of this from your clients daily!

Knowledge is something that you can gain without having a certificate. I certainly am guilty of that! ACK! I better stop my activities on all the discussion boards, because I don't have the training either. Looking back over my own medical history...If I had the choice of going to someone that had specific knowledge of gluten sensitivity without proper creds or going the mainstream medical route ...I'd really have to seriously consider going with the person with specific knowledge w/o the creds. The docs I went to all had proper creds , but yet none of them told me "Hey, maybe gluten is your problem". In fact, the gastro that I went to dismissed my food journals. Dismissed that gluten could be a problem for me before and after my negative biopsy results. I know my experience is not unique! So, where did all the creds get me? No where. I still didn't have answer. I still felt like crap. Well... I didn't die on the table..that's gotta account for somethin' ;)

I'm sure Dr. Fine is not misrepresenting his education. However, just because went to Baylor and is board certified - does it mean that his tests are valid? Could he be bilking customers/patients out of thousands/millions of dollars? We both know that most of mainstream medicine discounts Dr. Fine's work - some feel it is quackery. I personally feel that he is on to something and his tests do carry some diagnostic weight. I hope I won't be proven wrong in the end. Licensing and Credentialing doesn't mean that the docs are on the up and up. I seem to remember seeing many many MD's in a QuackWatch list [a site that I can take or leave, BTW. That's another post...]. I wonder how many of them had valid credentials? Are they Good Docs gone bad? Docs Gone Wild?


Being a lady of science, should you be demanding proper scientific evidence of Dr. Fine's work in stool testing? You do demand it for Ms. Smith knowledge and training.

Also, if you feel strongly that Ms. Smith is doing something unethical, illegal - she should be reported to the proper authorities for investigation. Isn't that the right thing to do?

I will ask Anne to see if she can get that article.

As for Peg and nurses - she has seen them step outside of their official boundaries from time to time. I'll just leave it at that. ;)

Oh - as far as "Pay for diploma" - I suspect one has to pay for any higher education diploma. ;) Why else would doctors have thousands of dollars in school loans when they get out? Monster party bills? :) hehehe I do know where you were going with that, I'm just being a smarta$$.

Take care! Interesting conversation.

Al

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 16 Jan 2009 16:59 #562

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Let me just say this..... I don't see you setting up an office and consulting website and charging $800 for your services with a fake diploma :D I think you have a better handle of Celiac and gluten sensitivity.  Like I said before, there's nothing wrong with being an informed Health Writer, which is really what she is. Anyone can call themselves a nutritionist. I'm sure in time someone will either report her to state authorities or try to sue her when she makes an error in judgement with someone on blood thinners or other medications (you can't get insurance without a license) so she's taking a pretty big risk.


My biggest disappointment is that she does have a good knowledge of non-celiac gluten sensitivity....but when the mainstream medical community finds out she doesn't have creditable (accredited) credentials everything she's written will be discredited. 

Do you recall what happened to John Gray who wrote Women are from Venus and Men are from Mars or was the book title Men are from Mars Women are from Venus. Anyway he called himself Dr. John Gray PhD. His book was a best seller...and to this day people still refer to the phrase. It was found out that he purchased his degree from a fake school....how embarrassing. People who understand the importance of "doing the hard work" for their credentials don't appreciate those who misrepresent themselves. He was a wonderful caring person but he ruined his life by taking the short cuts. 

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 16 Jan 2009 17:08 #563

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People have asked me if I ever considered being a GF lifestyle coach/consultant. I have considered it, but I wouldn't do it without having some proper training. What school did she go to? LOL!!

Instead, I do it for free on several websites - being only a lowly computer jocky ;)

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 16 Jan 2009 17:21 #564

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[user=2]Debra[/user] wrote:

My biggest disappointment is that she does have a good knowledge of non-celiac gluten sensitivity....but when the mainstream medical community find out she doesn't have creditable (accredited) credentials everything she's written will be discredited. 

Do you recall what happened to John Grey who wrote Women are from Venus and Men are from Mars or was the book title Men are from Mars Women are from Venus. Anyway he called himself Dr. John Grey PhD. His book was a best seller...and to this day people still refer to the phrase. It was found out that he purchased his degree from a fake school....how embarrassing. People who understand the importance of "doing the hard work" for their credentials don't appreciate those who misrepresent themselves. He was a wonderful caring person but he ruined his life by taking the short cuts. 


I had not heard that about John Grey. I have heard of the book, tho. Sad, but interesting.

I guess there are several quotes that come to mind...

Cheaters never prosper
Hard work always pays off
It's a long way to the top if you want to Rock n Roll [gotta love AC/DC]

It goes to show, we always must be on our toes!! I've seen Ms Smith's website and info, cant say I've ever checked in to her background. It's a good lesson for me.

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 16 Jan 2009 17:32 #565

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[user=246]aklap[/user] wrote:

People have asked me if I ever considered being a GF lifestyle coach/consultant. I have considered it, but I wouldn't do it without having some proper training. What school did she go to? LOL!!

Instead, I do it for free on several websites - being only a lowly computer jockey ;)

Al, you could call the University of Madison, they might have a distance program in dietetics..but then you'd have to do a 6 month to a year unpaid internship. :? Getting the degree was the easy part...getting into an internship program is harder...they don't take everyone. Out of my class of 35 at ISU only around 25 of us got into internship programs around the country.... required for the RD, then you MUST pass a comprehensive 3 hour exam in order to apply for a license. You can reapply to take the exam after 3 months if you fail. If you don't pass it, you lose your job if you were hired prior to the exam. Thankfully I passed on the first try as most of my fellow classmates. I think there was only 1 person who had to retake it.

Better Nutrition Magazine - Jan 2009 16 Jan 2009 17:34 #566

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It's along way to the top if you want to Rock n Roll [gotta love AC/DC]

:D:D:D You are too funny.
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